Sunday, December 17, 2017

Detroit Free Press Drops Some Breadcrumbs On Detroit Election Investigations

Someone knows something over at the Detroit Free Press about election investigations.

Thanks for the breadcrumbs.

-2017-1102-rb-me-detroit-election041.jpg_20171107.jpgOur editorial: State must oversee Winfrey’s operation


The irony of the inability to complete a legitimate recount of the Detroit City clerk election is that the screw-ups that tainted so many ballots were among the best reasons Clerk Janice Winfrey should have been unseated in the first place.
Winfrey’s inability to manage an error-free election is disenfranchising Detroit voters.
But the chaos serves her own interests very well. Not being able to recount the tainted ballots, particularly those cast by absentee voters, thwarted a recount by her challenger in the November election, Garland Gilchrist II.
Twenty-eight percent of the precinct sample requested by Gilchrist III could not be recounted for various reasons.
In some cases, the sealed ballot boxes contained far fewer ballots than was reported in the Department of Elections official tally.
Seals were found broken or boxes were otherwise unsecured, making the ballots inside ineligible for the recount.
Similar problems occurred in Detroit in the 2016 presidential election, when a recount of Michigan was started and then stopped. That recount could not have gone reliably forward because so many ballots in Detroit were spoiled.
Winfrey can’t seem to get it right. So she shouldn’t be allowed to run another election without intense oversight.
Before the next city election, next August’s primary for state and federal offices, the state secretary of state should put Winfrey and her staff through a thorough training program.
She should be given a clear checklist of what must be done to protect the integrity of an election.
And on Election Day, the state should deploy trained workers to help assure the Detroit staff gets it right.
The right to vote is too precious to allow it to be denied through bureaucratic bungling. The 2018 election will be vital to Detroit and Michigan. City voters will be electing a new congressman, as well as helping pick a governor and other state officeholders.
The outcomes may well depend on Winfrey’s ability to do the job she sought.
We’re reluctant to suggest a state takeover of any Detroit city function by the state, given the hard feelings generated by past interventions.
But the right to vote and have your vote counted must be assured to city voters.
If Winfrey can’t do it, the state will have to step in.

Voting is beautiful, be beautiful ~ vote.©

Day 58.8. Salisbury University - The Real Ellis Island


Voting is beautiful, be beautiful ~ vote.©

Day 58.8 Heading To Salisbury, MD.


Voting is beautiful, be beautiful ~ vote.©

If Mathew Spencer Peterson Can Be A Federal Judge, Then A Pro Se Can, Too

This man has no legal acumen to even hold a gavel.

There is nothing written in the U.S. Constitution which mandates a private corporation, the American Bar Association, to decide who has access to a court of law, including access to opportunies to either be appointed or elected to the judicial branch.

States and local governments allow the people to vote for judges, even though the campaign finance systems sucks in the area of judicial candidates, so why is it we cannot have federal elections for judges?

A pro se litigant has more experience than this man, and I just so happen to know a pro se litigant who can run circles around most judges. attorneys. House Judiciary members and their staffers.


Voting is beautiful, be beautiful ~ vote.©

Day 58.7. “Russian Retreat” Really? Or Ellis Island For Russians?


Voting is beautiful, be beautiful ~ vote.©

Spoofing For Policy: The Transposable Model Of Net Neutrality Policy Formation Process

This video is an actual person, PewDiePie, who has a base of almost 58 million, with thousands of other online vloggers, expressing public concerns to Net Neutrality, with tens of millions of more followers, whose views have been silenced from main stream media, and now through a cyber suppression of speech.



Sometimes, it is not about the policy, but the process of policy formation.

It is called Restoring Internet Freedom and it is nothing more than a product from the transposable privatization model of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, a child welfare model.

In this instance, online comments were used as a form of voting mechanism, with no verificaiton of identities, or, more than likely AI bots programmed to enteract and engage as anti-net neurtrality agents of communities.

If this is the case, that means dissinformation was disseminated that corrupted the public record in manipulation of data.

These data are used, in the same exact fashion as the purposes of the Library of Congress to advise in the obviation of policy.

This is false advise, in turn, strips the vote of the people by having the Member vote in accordance to its constiuents, who just so happen to be in this scenario, propaganda bots.

This is the transposable model for the historic investigation and why I am the scribe of history as an original source, or "Spoofing For Policy" because you must always ask yourself, "Cui bono?"

More than a Million Pro-Repeal Net Neutrality Comments were Likely Faked

I used natural language processing techniques to analyze net neutrality comments submitted to the FCC from April-October 2017, and the results were disturbing.

The FCC is blocking a law enforcement investigation into fraudulent comments designed to provide bogus support for the agency’s looming net neutrality repeal. New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman recently announced his office has been conducting an investigation into who submitted millions of fraudulent comments (some using the identities of dead people) during the public comment period.

The FCC is already facing a lawsuit alleging the agency ignored FOIA requests pertaining to these fake comments. The agency similarly told me there was nothing it could do after someone hijacked my identity to claim I falsely supported killing net neutrality protections.

Detailed analysis of the record 22 million comments filed with the agency indicate the majority of the public overwhelmingly supports keeping the rules intact. But several analysts also found that some group or individual tried to counter this genuine opposition with fake support for the plan. Schneiderman's office believes these comments were filed by a bot that pulled identities from a compromised database of some kind.

According to Schneiderman, his office made nine attempts over a period of five months to obtain server logs, API key details, or other information that could aid his office’s investigation into the identity theft. But in a public letter to FCC boss Ajit Pai, Schneiderman noted that the agency simply refused to aid the investigation in any capacity whatsoever.

“We all have a powerful reason to hold accountable those who would steal Americans’ identities and assault the public’s right to be heard in government rulemaking,” argued Schneiderman. “If law enforcement can’t investigate and (where appropriate) prosecute when it happens on this scale, the door is open for it to happen again and again.”

Last week, the FCC doubled down on its refusal to cooperate in a more formal response to the AG.
In a letter to the AG’s office by FCC General Counsel Thomas Johnson, the agency lawyer again makes it clear the FCC has no interest in helping law enforcement get to the bottom of whoever is behind the farmed support for its repeal. Throughout the letter, Johnson repeatedly tries to imply that the wholesale fraud that occurred is inconsequential.

Johnson told the AG’s office that "while your letter suggests that the public comment process was somehow 'corrupted' by the alleged submission of comments under false names, you offer no evidence that this activity affected the Commission’s ability to review and respond to comments in the record."

Under the Administrative Procedures Act, the FCC is required to solicit and seriously consider relevant comments from the public whenever issuing what’s called a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM). Consumer groups charge the current FCC is not only ignoring the massive public backlash to the rules’ repeal, but is turning a blind eye to comment fraud in order to raise doubts about the validity of the entire process—and therefore the value of legitimate public opposition.

In the letter, Johnson tries to argue that manipulation of the FCC comment process is routine, while subsequently downplaying the importance of the comment process itself.

“As in many important rulemakings, this proceeding carries the potential for advocates on either side to abuse the process to create an appearance of numerical advantage," Johnson said. "But the Commission does not make policy decisions merely by tallying the comments on either side of a proposal to determine what position has greater support, nor does it attribute greater weight to comments based on the submitter's identity."

Johnson also tried to imply that actually helping the AG’s inquiry into the bogus comments would be “too burdensome” for the FCC.

“Your staff has previously asked us to provide logs of Internet Protocol ("IP") addresses for certain comments,” said Johnson. “Even assuming that these logs would indicate that some comments originated from cloud-based automatic ‘bots,’ many others would reflect the IP addresses of authentic human users. It would be unduly burdensome, if not impossible, for the Commission to separate legitimate from illegitimate entries in the logs. Revealing the IP addresses of public commenters would also raise significant personal privacy concerns."

Given many of these folks either don’t exist or are mysteriously deceased, this sudden professed dedication to consumer privacy rings hollow (especially given the agency’s recent support of killing consumer broadband privacy protections). Similarly, FCC staffers have told me it would be relatively trivial for the FCC to provide data indicating which group used FCC APIs to submit fraudulent comments en masse.

Needless to say, Schneiderman’s office wasn’t particularly impressed by the FCC’s apathy to the problem.

"Today the FCC make[s] clear that it will continue to obstruct a law enforcement investigation," said Amy Spitalnick, a spokeswoman for Schneiderman’s office. "It’s easy for the FCC to claim that there’s no problem with the process, when they’re hiding the very information that would allow us to determine if there was a problem."

FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel also blasted the FCC's refusal to cooperate.

"This letter shows the FCC’s sheer contempt for public input and unreasonable failure to support integrity in its process," said Rosenworcel. "To put it simply, there is evidence in the FCC’s files that fraud has occurred and the FCC is telling law enforcement and victims of identity theft that it is not going to help. Moreover, the FCC refuses to look into how nearly half a million comments came from Russian sources. Failure to investigate this corrupted record undermines our process for seeking public input in the digital age."

As it stands, consumer advocacy firms indicate that undermining the process appears to have been the entire point. If you downplay the importance and integrity of the public’s one opportunity to weigh in on the FCC’s plan, it’s easier to pretend said plan is in the public interest.

Unfortunately for the FCC, this problem won’t be going away anytime soon. Despite requests to delay the vote by Schneiderman’s office and others, the FCC is scheduled to repeal the rules on Thursday. Once the repeal hits the federal register in January, the FCC will be bombarded with lawsuits accusing the agency of ignoring the public interest. Expect the agency’s failure to police comment fraud to play a starring role in these legal arguments to come.

Voting is beautiful, be beautiful ~ vote.©

Day 58.4. Whoa Nellie - Did You Radio To Springfield, VA


Fusion GPS admits DOJ official's wife Nellie Ohr hired to probe Trump


bruceohr
Bruce Ohr, Demoted DOJ official in Fusion GPS investigation
A co-founder of the opposition research firm Fusion GPS acknowledged in a new court document that his company hired the wife of a senior Justice Department official to help investigate then-candidate Donald Trump last year.

Simpson’s statement shows Mrs. Ohr was indeed involved in the Trump research. He said bank records reflect Fusion GPS contracted with her “to help our company with its research and analysis of Mr. Trump.”

Further, Simpson said he disclosed to the House intelligence committee that he met personally with Bruce Ohr, “at his request, after the November 2016 election to discuss our findings regarding Russia and the election.”

Fox News first reported last week that Bruce Ohr had been demoted at the DOJ amid an ongoing investigation into his contacts with Fusion GPS. Evidence collected by the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HPSCI), chaired by Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., indicates that Ohr met during the 2016 campaign with Christopher Steele, the former British spy who authored the “dossier.” Additionally, as acknowledged in the court filing, he met with Simpson after the election.

Fusion GPS has attracted scrutiny because Republican lawmakers have spent the better part of this year investigating whether the dossier, which was funded by the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee, served as the basis for the Justice Department and the FBI to obtain FISA surveillance last year on a Trump campaign adviser named Carter Page.

On Tuesday, Trump lawyer Jay Sekulow called for the appointment of a separate special prosecutor to look into potential conflicts of interest involving Justice Department and FBI officials.

A group of House Republicans for months has called for the appointment of a second special counsel to probe certain Obama and Clinton-related controversies, something Attorney General Jeff Sessions is reviewing.

When asked Tuesday about the Sekulow call, Sessions noted he’s already ordered that review following the prior call from members of Congress.

“I’ve put a senior attorney, with the resources he may need, to review cases in our office and make a recommendation to me ... if things aren’t being pursued that need to be pursued, if cases may need more resources to complete in a proper manner, and to recommend to me if the standards for a special counsel are met,” he said, calling that the “appropriate” course. 

Voting is beautiful, be beautiful ~ vote.©

Day 58.1 Mueller Got 13 Mail Accounts With a GSA Letter?


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Testimonials On Beverly Tran Featuring Michigan Attorney General & Gubernatorial Candidate Bill Schuette

What better way to let the public know about the quality and reliability of one's work than with testimonials!

Reporting and ameliorating fraud is not just a passion, it is my mission.

Besides, if Bill Schuette refuses to do his job as Attorney General, I guess I have to.

Testimonials

"Beverly Tran is a public nuisance."

Michigan Attorney General and Gubernatorial Candidate, Bill Schuette, November 29, 2017


Detroit Land Bank Authority, "Legal Geniuses" (trademark pending), December 1, 2017

As a disclaimer, I am not journaling on a political platform because I am neither a fan of Gretchen Whitmore.

Michigan does not have an Hatch Act and I feel this is going to be quite an interesting story to follow under the illumination of similar, if not symbiotic, campaign finance schemes under federal investigations.

The Hatch Act, a federal law passed in 1939, limits certain political activities of federal employees, as well as some state, D.C., and local government employees who work in connection with federally funded programs. ​The law’s purposes are to ensure that federal programs are administered in a nonpartisan fashion, to protect federal employees from political coercion in the workplace, and to ensure that federal employees are advanced based on merit and not based on political affiliation.​​​​ ​​

Bill Schuette stocks AG staff with GOP operatives as he launches campaign for governor


LANSING — Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette has loaded his taxpayer-funded office payroll with Republican campaign activists in the run-up to his 2018 campaign for governor, a Free Press investigation has found.

Schuette also has used no-bid state contracts to pay more than $130,000 to two influential Republicans — one of whom has been active in the tea party movement that is important in winning a Republican primary, records show.

The state constitution and civil service rules prohibit hiring or firing employees based on partisan considerations, enshrining the idea that a professional state workforce based solely on merit should remain in place, regardless of what party or leader is in power.

But this year, in advance of his September announcement that he is running for governor, Schuette hired as civil servants four "constituent relations representatives," also known as "executive office representatives," who are all Republican activists or experienced GOP campaign operatives, records obtained under Michigan's Freedom of Information Act show.

They joined other highly politicized appointees and civil servants on Schuette's executive staff, all paid for by taxpayers. They include Schuette's driver, a political appointee who is paid more than $82,000 a year as a "special assistant" but doubles as Schuette's campaign treasurer, and two others with civil servant posts — a self-described "tea party organizer" and another constituent relations representative who was political director for Schuette's 2014 attorney general campaign and recently took a leave of absence to work full-time on his campaign for governor.

Schuette's executive office representatives are responsible for public outreach, giving speeches to service clubs and community groups, educating people about the department's programs and trouble-shooting issues raised by constituents, according to Schuette spokeswoman Andrea Bitely and department records.

Schuette's two predecessors — Republican Attorney General Mike Cox and Democratic Attorney General Jennifer Granholm — did not have these positions, though Cox had a director of constituent relations near the end of his eight years in office, state records show.

"That's a Bill Schuette thing ... making sure we have people out there who are listening," Schuette spokeswoman Andrea Bitely said.

"Receive rather than broadcast," she said.

"These people aren't hired because of their partisan politics. They're hired because they're the best and brightest."

Schuette's recently hired constituent relations representatives, positioned in attorney general offices around the state, are:

Judi Schwalbach: Hired in May as a constituent relations representative at about $50,000 a year, the former Escanaba mayor is an influential Republican in the Upper Peninsula who was a delegate to last year's Republican National Convention and attended President Donald Trump's inauguration. A member of the Republican State Committee, she works out of the attorney general's Marquette office.

Luke Londo: Also hired in May, Londo, a $52,000-a-year constituent relations representative, was digital director for the 2014 campaign of U.S. Rep. Dan Benishek, R-Crystal Falls, and a former regional press secretary for the Michigan Republican Party. He works in the attorney general's Detroit office.

Michael Sullivan: Hired in May as a $45,000-a-year constituent relations representative, Sullivan was coordinator of the 2014 state House campaign of Rep. Lee Chatfield, R-Levering, and has worked for a political consulting firm owned by Scott Greenlee, a former Schuette aide and campaign worker. He works in Lansing.

Brandon Sinclair: Hired in March as a $35,000-a-year constituent relations representative, Sinclair is a former political coordinator for the Kent County Republican Party who managed the 2016 campaign of state Rep. Tommy Brann, R-Wyoming. He works in Grand Rapids.

A report filed in October shows Schwalbach, Sullivan and Sinclair were all paid expense reimbursements this year by Bill Schuette for Governor, meaning each has been working on his campaign.

Schuette was unapologetic Dec. 6, when a reporter pointed out that his executive office representatives were Republican activists and Schuette supporters.

"They'd better be, or they're not going to be working for me," he said.

Schuette, who took office in 2011, softened his answer when asked whether that wouldn't violate civil service rules.

"You don't have to be a Republican, but you'd better have a relationship with Bill Schuette, or I wouldn't hire those people," he said. "I need to trust them, and I do."

Bitely said nobody does campaign work on state time, which would violate state law.

"I can't speak to what people are doing in their spare time," Bitely said.

Carter Bundy, a former field director for Michigan native Mitt Romney's presidential bid, illustrates the sometimes fluid relationship between Schuette's campaign and his state-funded office.

Bundy served as political director for Schuette's 2014 attorney general campaign receiving close to $62,000 in wages and expense reimbursements from Schuette's campaign fund — while taking unpaid leave from his then $40,000-a-year civil service job as a constituent relations representative for the attorney general's office. Bundy, who returned to his full-time job after the campaign, recently took a leave of absence from his now $74,000-a-year job so he can work full-time on Schuette's gubernatorial campaign.

J. Edward Kellough, a professor of public administration at the University of Georgia and an expert on civil service reform, said the situation in Schuette's office sounds unusual.

"There has been a trend in recent years to increasingly politicize the civil service," Kellough said in an e-mail Thursday. "I find that a very troubling trend that can undermine the integrity of the civil service."

Bitely said the job openings were posted on the state website and a committee of departmental officials followed civil service rules by not asking candidates about political affiliations during interviews.

While the vast majority of attorney general employees are supposed to be hired based solely on merit, without considering their partisan politics, Schuette is allowed up to five appointees who are not subject to civil service rules and serve at his pleasure. Duties of those officials also overlap with Schuette campaigns.

Dennis Starner, Schuette's driver and longtime friend and sounding board, is paid more than $82,000 a year as a "special assistant," but has another role that is arguably of equal or greater importance. Starner, a former chairman of the Midland County Republican Party, handles the accounting of millions in campaign donations and expenditures as Schuette's campaign treasurer.

Schuette's other appointees include Rusty Hills, and John Sellek. Hills, who earns more than $157,000 a year as Schuette's director of public affairs, was paid about $93,000 for his work on the 2010 campaign and has received more than $1,300 in campaign expense reimbursements since Schuette took office. Sellek, who is paid more than $153,000 as Schuette's director of public relations, took an unpaid leave during the 2014 campaign and has received about $95,000 in campaign consulting fees and expense reimbursements since 2013.

The four new constituent relations representatives joined civil servants already serving in Schuette's executive office in Lansing, who records show have worked on his attorney general or gubernatorial campaigns, including:

Wendy Anderson: The supervisor of Schuette's constituent relations representatives, Anderson, a frequent donor to Republican candidates and causes who has also listed her occupation as owner of a GOP campaign consulting firm called Election Resources, has worked for Schuette since he took office and is paid about $95,000 a year.

Sharon Lollio: Paid about $81,000 as Schuette's deputy director of legislative relations, Lollio's Facebook page describes her as a "tea party organizer." She joined Schuette's office in 2011.

In rejecting suggestions that Schuette's work is driven by partisan interests, Bitely noted Schuette has worked closely with Genesee County Prosecutor David Leyton — a Democrat who ran against Schuette in 2010 — in prosecuting alleged crimes arising from the Flint water crisis.

Though having four constituent relations representatives in the attorney general's office is unique to Schuette, and the recently hired employees are new, the positions themselves are not. At least four GOP activists who worked for Schuette during his 2014 campaign for attorney general have since left their constituent relations positions. They are:

Scott Greenlee: The president of Greenlee Consulting and the Michigan director of Sen. John McCain's 2008 presidential campaign, Greenlee, who left Schuette's office in 2016, was an $89,000-a-year constituent relations representative who received close to $7,400 in consulting fees and expense reimbursements from Schuette's campaign fund between 2010 and 2015. Greenlee stood out among Schuette insiders as an early supporter of Gov. Rick Snyder, who has frequently been at odds with Schuette and is not expected to endorse him for governor.

Matt Hall: Schuette's former constituent relations representative in Grand Rapids was paid about $77,000 a year when he left in 2016. He is a Republican State Committee member and was 3rd Congressional District chairman of the Trump presidential campaign. Records show he worked on Schuette's 2014 campaign.

Shannon Price: A former Republican Wayne County commissioner and Plymouth Township supervisor, Price was paid about $87,000 a year as a Schuette constituency relations representative in Lansing and Detroit until he left the office in 2015. He earlier served as a political appointee to both Schuette and his predecessor, Cox, before moving to the civil service late in 2011.

Stanley Grot: Now a Republican candidate for Secretary of State, Grot was an attorney general executive office representative under Schuette until February 2012, when he launched his successful campaign for Shelby Township clerk, records show. Grot, a GOP district chair, is a former Sterling Heights city councilman and Macomb County commissioner.

Records obtained under FOIA show that since 2011, Schuette has awarded a series of contracts to Glenn Clark, a former president of the Michigan Faith and Freedom Coalition, a former Michigan GOP district chair who was an Oakland County tea party activist.

The contracts, each worth between $25,000 and $50,000, are for making presentations related to Schuette's programs on Internet safety, protections for seniors, and the OK2SAY student safety initiative, records show.

Bitely said the total amount paid to Clark under the contracts was just under $117,000.

Though the contracts weren't awarded through competitive bidding, which Bitely said was not required, interested vendors had to submit a résumé and/or cover letter and be interviewed by Schuette's consumer protection team.

"We are interested in candidates who are comfortable with technology and speaking in front of an audience," as well as "diversity in terms of geographic location, race, and gender," she said. Most of the 36 current contractors are former educators, she said.

Clark, who is supporting Schuette for governor, said Schuette's office felt his experience organizing school fund-raising projects with Nestlé was a benefit in arranging appointments for presentations in schools.

Clark said Wednesday he left the Faith and Freedom Coalition in 2013 and doesn't currently have time for tea party activities because he is caring for his 99-year-old grandmother.

Schwalbach, the former Escanaba mayor, received just under $14,000 through similar contracts before Schuette hired her as a civil servant this year, Bitely said.

Voting is beautiful, be beautiful ~ vote.©

Saturday, December 16, 2017

Hillary Clinton, State Department, Department Of Defense & Google

Clinton email reveals: Google sought overthrow of Syria's Assad



Google Is Not What It Seems

Voting is beautiful, be beautiful ~ vote.©

Day 57 - Fusion GPS and JUNIOR Dossier: Magnitsky Act & Child Welfare Fraud

For a true background on the Magnitsky Act, I am the original source, and, as such, have provided links, below.

Selling chattel is the oldest form of survival because no one cares about the children, and if you think you do, then why have you never spoken out on foster care & adoption being human trafficking?

It is about the trust funds.

Stay tuned.



CONYERS: Judiciary Democrats Demand Answers On Abrupt DOJ Settlement Of Fraud Case Handled By Russian Lawyer Who Met With Trump Jr.

Day 44.5 Lisa Page - EB5 "Family" Visas?

Zoe's Ark: There Are No Blurred Lines Between Humanitarian Aid And Exploitation

Clinton Foundation, Detroit Land Bank Authority & Russia: How The U.S. Is Being Ripped Off Through Child Welfare

U.S. Completely Shut Down In International Adoptions





Voting is beautiful, be beautiful ~ vote.©

Congress To Be Rocked Starting On Monday, December 18, 2017

When my friend has gossipDo not fret for this is only round one.

The real show is going to blow your mind and we are coming down to the States, al the way down to your local elected officials, staff, former elected officials and former staff.


Stay tuned.

On a mission...


FBI & Mueller Team ‘To Be Rocked’ In Next 72 Hours; Wray & Sessions Brace for Blockbuster Dirt on Bureau Corruption



My top 5 congressional wish list for indictments:

  1. Nancy Pelosi;
  2. Sheila Jackson Lee;
  3. Dan Kildee;
  4. Debbie Dingell;
  5. Debbie Stabenow.
Debbie Wasserman Schultz has already been tagged.

Remember these names.


Voting is beautiful, be beautiful ~ vote.©

The U.S. Blue Plastic Bag Of International Child Trafficking Propaganda

A 15-year old was in the process of being sold into
forced labour by suspected traffickers and was intercepted
just before the transaction could be completed.
The blue plastic bag contained her entire possessions.
"The blue plastic bag contained her entire possessions"

This is the description of a child rescured by an INTERPOL led human trafficking operation.

Does this sound familiar?

Well, of course it does because it is foster care, the U.S. model of human trafficking, in the name of the tax exempt God.

Now, take the time to watch this high quality, U.S. foster care propaganda video to see how trafficking children is all warm and fuzzy, and how they raise money to make sure they have something better than a "blue plastic bag" when they are trafficked from place to place.


What they will not tell you in these videos is about the rapes, tortures, drugging as lab rats, and how their trust funds are stolen.

Some, not many, U.S. foster kids get blue duffle bags, now.
So, what is the difference?

To begin, U.S. children who are trafficked now have "blue duffle bags" to carry around their worldly possessions, well, not all of them, just a few, a very few, because the money they raise has to pay operational expenses like funding political campaigns, luxury vacations, and personal shopping sprees to look good for the fundraising events. 

Then we have the issue I previously raised with Faith Based Initiative funding inder the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. State Department.

Blue Campaign
U.S. Department of Homeland Security - Faith Based Initiative Human Trafficking Blue Campaign
The federal End Human Trafficking Blue Campaign is now under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, with its international sister program in the U.S. State Department United States Agency for International Developmemt (USAID) of the U.S. Department of State Office of Religion and Foreign Affiars, the same Office Brownback is taking over.

Learn more: BEVERLY TRAN: FBI, DHS, Faith Based Initiatives & Child Welfare Fraud In Detroit http://beverlytran.blogspot.com/2017/12/fbi-dhs-faith-based-initiatives-child.html#ixzz51SryXlqy
Stop Medicaid Fraud in Child Welfare 


These federal departments only fund propaganda campaigns to make it look like they are doing something to end child trafficking.

Even the U.S. House Judiciary Committee jumped on the "blue" child welfare propaganda fundraising campaign by co-opting pinwheel symbols to launch their reelection campaign fundraising.


Notice the blue fundraising pinwheel is at the end of the Judiciary video, then compare it to the child abuse and neglect awareness fundraising campaign of blue pinwheels.


But wait, there is one more agency that has powers over missing and exploited children, The U.S. Secret Service.
In 1994, Congress mandated the Secret Service provide forensic and technical assistance in matters involving missing and exploited children. The Secret Service offers this assistance to federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.  (WARNING: The link to NCMEC is not secured for some reason.  It may be due to the recent redo of the Secret Service website, or the fact that NCMEC engages in questionable activities.)
So, what has the Secret Service been doing all these years to deal with child trafficking in the U.S. and what is their budget?

I say it is fine time for what I like to call a collaborative conjugation and pool all this propaganda coverup money, hand it over to FBI so they can construct and lead centralized operations in the U.S. to better work with the States and INTERPOL.

Perhaps, I will just go ahead, design a model and advocate for more independence of the FBI in ending child welfare fraud by allwoing them to blossom and do what they can do best.


Child trafficking is foster care and adoption, neatly packaged and sold to the public in a blue plastic propaganda bag.

Much love to my INTERPOL #Superfans but it is time to do that collaborative conjugation and hit the profiteers behind human trafficking, and I know exactly who they are.



COTONOU, Benin – Nearly 500 victims of human trafficking, including 236 minors, have been rescued following an INTERPOL operation carried out simultaneously across Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Niger and Senegal.

 In total, 40 suspected traffickers were arrested and will now face prosecution for offences including human trafficking, forced labour and child exploitation.

They are accused of forcing victims to engage in activities ranging from begging to prostitution, with little to no regard for working conditions or human life.

 In one case, a 16-year old Nigerian girl was promised work in Mali which would allow her to care for her family.

She was taken on by a ‘sponsor’ who then forced her into prostitution to reimburse her travel costs. In another case, a 15-year old was in the process of being sold into forced labour by suspected traffickers and was intercepted just before the transaction could be completed.

The victim was found holding a blue plastic bag containing their entire possessions.

 To ensure that victims received the necessary care following their rescue, the International Office for Migration (IOM) and several NGOs were involved in post-operation interviews and treatment. Operation Epervier was held under the aegis of the Sahel Project, an initiative funded by the German Foreign Office which targets the organized crime groups behind human trafficking across the region. Officers from INTERPOL’s Regional Bureaus in Abidjan and Yaounde assisted in coordinating the operation, which also included specialist officers from INTERPOL’s Trafficking in Human Beings unit at its General Secretariat headquarters in Lyon, France.

 “In addition to arrests, this operation has opened a number of ongoing investigations to further disrupt the crime networks involved in trafficking in human beings, emphasizing the effectiveness of such operations via INTERPOL’s international network,” said Yoro Traore, a Police Inspector with the INTERPOL National Central Bureau in Bamako.

 “The results of this operation underline the challenge faced by law enforcement and all stakeholders in addressing human trafficking in the Sahel region,” said Innocentia Apovo, Criminal Intelligence officer with INTERPOL’s Trafficking in Human Beings Unit and coordinator of the operation.

She also thanked the German Foreign Office for their continued support of such initiatives.

 The operation was followed by a regional working group meeting in Cotonou, gathering 100 participants from 15 countries across West Africa and the Sahel. Discussions focused on the outcomes of Operation Epervier as well as the way forward for future activities in the region.

 “This type of regional exchange is important to ensure that good and not so good practices are shared, to ensure that we collectively improve on prevention, protection and prosecution,” said Anke Strauss, IOM’s Chief of missions in Mauritania. Emerging trends in human trafficking will be high on the agenda of the 5th INTERPOL Global Conference on Trafficking in Human Beings and Smuggling of Migrants, which will be held on 6 and 7 December 2017 in Doha, Qatar.

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CONYERS Sexual Harassment Documents Plagiarized

As the Conyers saga continues, it seems "someone" came up with the brilliant idea of plagiarizing sexual harassment allegations agaisnt Schumer by using the exact same tempplate of sexual harassment allegations lodged against Conyers, lifted from court filings.

Why?

Perhaps the sexual harassment allegations against Conyers are also fake, but hey, what do I know?

You will just have to ask Lisa Bloom or Mike Cernovich.

Stay tuned.

Forged Schumer Sexual Harassment Complaint Plagiarized Conyers Documents

U.S. Capitol Police investigating source of forgery

Updated 3:48 p.m. | The forged court complaint outlining sexual harassment claims against Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer directly copied a portion of the authentic court records of similar accusations against Rep. John Conyers, the Daily Beast reported.

Both the completely fabricated Schumer complaint and the authentic Conyers complaint reference “House Rule 23,” which of course would not have applied to Schumer, who was a senator in 2012, the year on the fake complaint document.

Right-wing social media personality Charles Johnson forwarded the now-debunked Schumer document to journalists, lawyers, and members of Congress “after communicating with the source [of the document] through encrypted email and texts,” Johnson wrote in a recent Facebook post. The source “went dark” after their contact, Johnson added.

“I enthusiastically look forward to an investigation,” Johnson, who indicated he has since learned the documents are fake, told The Daily Beast Wednesday.

Schumer and a former staffer became the victims of a fraudulent smear scheme Tuesday after various news outlets were sent the fabricated court document.

“It was a phony allegation, forged. False from start to finish,” Schumer said at a news conference Wednesday. “We are pursuing every legal path.”

Schumer’s office has asked the U.S. Capitol Police to pursue criminal charges once it identifies any suspects after completing an investigation into who forged and proliferated the document, Roll Call confirmed Wednesday.

The 13-page document was forged to appear like a legal complaint lodged in the District of Columbia’s U.S. District Court. In the doctored complaint, a former woman staffer who worked for Schumer from 2009 to 2012 appears to allege incidents of sexual harassment against the senator.

“The document is a forged document and every allegation is false. We have turned it over to the Capitol Police and asked them to investigate and pursue criminal charges because it is clear the law has been broken,” Schumer's communications director, Matt House, said in a statement.

“We believe the individual responsible for forging the document should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law to prevent other malicious actors from doing the same.”

In an email to Roll Call Wednesday, the Federal Bureau of Investigation deferred comment to the U.S. Capitol Police, whose spokeswoman said the department does not comment on ongoing investigations.

The former staffer to whom the complaint is attributed has denied the veracity of any of the allegations and said the document was a forgery, adding that she left Schumer’s office in 2012.

“The claims in this document are completely false, my signature is forged and even basic facts about me are wrong,” the former staffer listed as the plaintiff in the document told ABC News in a statement.

“I have contacted law enforcement to determine who is responsible. I parted with Senator Schumer’s office on good terms and have nothing but the fondest memories of my time there,” she said.

Multiple outlets have reported they could not match the document to any in a search on the PACER database that D.C.’s U.S. District Court uses.

Schumer was away from the capital — and, in one instance, not even in the country — on at least two of the dates of alleged misconduct, sources told news outlets.

Reporters from the Washington Post, CNN, BuzzFeed, The New Yorker, and ABC all sent queries to Schumer’s office after they were offered the documents, Axios reported Tuesday.

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Friday, December 15, 2017

FBI Hits Human Trafficking In The U.S.: Same Fraud, Different Funding Sources

Drats!

I was meaning to do a piece on adult adoptions.

Anyway, allow me to fill in the blanks.

Before there was "gay marriage", there was adult adoption, where one would adopt their partner in order to share the benefits of "straight marriage".

I always said this was the best way to circumvent deportation laws and get citizenship because this is what they do with children in international adoptions.

If the FBI is going after adult adoption schemes, then the next stage is to go after child adoption schemes because the only difference is that child adoptions use federal funding.

Human trafficking in the U.S. same fraud scheme, different funding sources.

Heads up, #FBI, corporations are now running complex adoption schemes, too..

Get 'em.


Elk Grove Man Sentenced to 20 Years in Prison for $1M Adult Adoption Immigration Fraud Scheme

Americans Helping America Chamber of Commerce Promised Citizenship to Members of Its “Migration Program” for a Price

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Helaman Hansen, 65, of Elk Grove, was sentenced today to 20 years in prison by U.S. District Judge Morrison C. England Jr. for operating an elaborate adult-adoption fraud scheme that targeted undocumented aliens, U.S. Attorney Phillip A. Talbert announced. Judge England also ordered Hansen to pay $576,264 in restitution.

On May 9, 2017, after an 11-day trial, a federal jury found Hansen guilty of 12 counts of mail fraud, three counts of wire fraud, and two counts of encouraging and inducing illegal immigration for private financial gain.

U.S. Attorney Talbert stated: “The sentence today acknowledges the vast number of people victimized by the defendant. He preyed upon hundreds of people who wanted to find a pathway to American citizenship and exploited their hopes and dreams for his own financial gain. The defendant’s lies and false promises caused many to part with substantial amounts of money, and in some instances, a lifetime’s worth of savings. I want to thank our federal partners at ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations and the FBI for their hard work in bringing the defendant justice.”

“Today’s decision should send a clear message to anyone who chooses to take advantage of innocent victims who are only trying to make a better life for themselves,” said Ryan L. Spradlin, special agent in charge of HSI San Francisco. “HSI continues to work closely with our law enforcement partners to seek out and arrest opportunistic swindlers who misrepresent our nation’s immigration laws for their own personal gain.”

“The FBI is committed to identifying and investigating fraud, especially when such crimes prey upon the most vulnerable people in our community. Legitimate pathways to citizenship for undocumented immigrants exist but adult adoption is not one of them. Unfortunately, Hansen knowingly accepted funds for adult adoption processes despite being informed that such would not aid his victims with obtaining citizenship,” said Special Agent in Charge Sean Ragan of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Sacramento Field Office.

According to evidence presented at trial, between October 2012 and January 2016, Hansen and others used various entities such as Americans Helping America (AHA) to sell memberships in what he called a “Migration Program.” A central feature of the program was the fraudulent claim that immigrant adults could achieve U.S. citizenship by being legally adopted by an American citizen and completing a list of additional tasks. At first, memberships were sold for an annual fee of $150, but that fee grew and eventually was as high as $10,000.

Although some victims completed the adoption stage of the “Migration Program,” not one person obtained citizenship. As early as October 2012, Hansen had been informed by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services that aliens adopted after their 16th birthday could not obtain citizenship in the manner Hansen was promoting. Despite that notification, Hansen and others acting at his direction induced approximately 500 victims to pay more than $1 million to join the fraudulent program.

This case was the product of an investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI). Assistant U.S. Attorneys André M. Espinosa and Katherine T. Lydon prosecuted the case.

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In Honor Of My 1,000,000th PageView, We Celebrate Child Welfare In Unveiling The Residuals Of The Peculiar Institution

Quaestiones morales
Since Google metrics were available to monitor my pageviews, I have officially exceeded 1,000,000
pageviews, today.

I wish to thank the individual(s) who was kind enough to reaffirm my research in child welfare fraud by sending me this ancient, Christian codex.

I would also like to express by gratitude to each and every individual, and institution, who perpetuates the residuals of the peculiar insitution in profiting from human trafficking child welfare through public corruption, in the name of the tax exempt God.

I do what I do to preserve the annals of history, for they have been manipulated and destroyed for centuries, even to this day.

The truth shall be revealed for I am the original source.

Godspeed until my 2,000,000th pageview.

Voting is beautiful, be beautiful ~ vote.©

Lisa Bloom Sucks, Badly

Oh, Lisa, darling, you suck, badly.

I spoofed you to break a congressional confidentiality agreement with just a click of a post.

Did I not warn you that you were out of your league?

How much did you get for your client, Marion Brown, because I know that your client went around getting other people to sign these statements....for money.

Oh, and how much did Mike Cernovich get paid for selling the congressional confidentiality agreement?

You may want to retain Perkins Coie to represent you, because you suck, Lisa Bloom and, obviously, you did not get the memo:

Do not be mean to my Sweetie.  Period.

Hey Lisa, ever been to Belgium?

Exclusive: Prominent lawyer sought donor cash for two Trump accusers



A well-known women’s rights lawyer sought to arrange compensation from donors and tabloid media outlets for women who made or considered making sexual misconduct allegations against Donald Trumpduring the final months of the 2016 presidential race, according to documents and interviews.

California lawyer Lisa Bloom’s efforts included offering to sell alleged victims’ stories to TV outlets in return for a commission for herself, arranging a donor to pay off one Trump accuser’s mortgage and attempting to secure a six-figure payment for another woman who ultimately declined to come forward after being offered as much as $750,000, the clients told The Hill.

The women’s accounts were chronicled in contemporaneous contractual documents, emails and text messages reviewed by The Hill, including an exchange of texts between one woman and Bloom that suggested political action committees supporting Hillary Clinton were contacted during the effort.
Bloom, who has assisted dozens of women in prominent harassment cases and also defended film executive Harvey Weinstein earlier this year, represented four women considering making accusations against Trump last year. Two went public, and two declined.

In a statement to The Hill, Bloom acknowledged she engaged in discussions to secure donations for women who made or considered making accusations against Trump before last year’s election.
“Donors reached out to my firm directly to help some of the women I represented,” said Bloom, whose clients have also included accusers of Bill Cosby and Bill O’Reilly.

Bloom said her goal in securing money was not to pressure the women to come forward, but rather to help them relocate or arrange security if they felt unsafe during the waning days of a vitriolic election. She declined to identify any of the donors.

And while she noted she represented sexual harassment victims for free or at reduced rates, she also acknowledged a standard part of her contracts required women to pay her commissions as high as 33 percent if she sold their stories to media outlets.

“Our standard pro bono agreement for legal services provides that if a media entity offers to compensate a client for sharing his or her story we receive a percentage of those fees. This rarely happens. But, on occasion, a case generates media interest and sometimes (not always) a client may receive an appearance fee,” she said.

“As a private law firm we have significant payroll, rent, taxes, insurance and other expenses every week, so an arrangement where we might receive some compensation to defray our costs seems reasonable to us and is agreed to by our clients,” Bloom added.

Bloom told The Hill she had no contact with Clinton or her campaign, but declined to address any contacts with super PACs that supported the Democratic presidential nominee.

Josh Schwerin, the communications director for Priorities USA Action, the largest pro-Clinton super PAC, told The Hill that the group had no relationship with Bloom and had no discussions with her about supporting Trump accusers.

One Bloom client who received financial help from Bloom was New York City makeup artist Jill Harth.

The former beauty contestant manager filed a sexual harassment lawsuit against Trump in 1997 and then withdrew it under pressure. The news media discovered the litigation during the election, and Harth’s name became public in the summer of 2016. She asked Bloom to represent her in the fall after hearing Trump describe her allegations against him as false, and became a vocal critic of Trump.
“I consider myself lucky to have had Lisa Bloom by my side after my old lawsuit resurfaced. She advised me with great competence and compassion,” Harth told The Hill.

Harth said she did not originally ask Bloom for money, even though her cosmetics business suffered from the notoriety of the campaign stories about her.

California lawyer Lisa Bloom’s efforts included offering to sell alleged victims’ stories to TV outlets in return for a commission for herself, arranging a donor to pay off one Trump accuser’s mortgage and attempting to secure a six-figure payment for another woman who ultimately declined to come forward after being offered as much as $750,000, the clients told The Hill.

The women’s accounts were chronicled in contemporaneous contractual documents, emails and text messages reviewed by The Hill, including an exchange of texts between one woman and Bloom that suggested political action committees supporting Hillary Clinton were contacted during the effort.
Bloom, who has assisted dozens of women in prominent harassment cases and also defended film executive Harvey Weinstein earlier this year, represented four women considering making accusations against Trump last year. Two went public, and two declined.

In a statement to The Hill, Bloom acknowledged she engaged in discussions to secure donations for women who made or considered making accusations against Trump before last year’s election.
“Donors reached out to my firm directly to help some of the women I represented,” said Bloom, whose clients have also included accusers of Bill Cosby and Bill O’Reilly.

Bloom said her goal in securing money was not to pressure the women to come forward, but rather to help them relocate or arrange security if they felt unsafe during the waning days of a vitriolic election. She declined to identify any of the donors.

And while she noted she represented sexual harassment victims for free or at reduced rates, she also acknowledged a standard part of her contracts required women to pay her commissions as high as 33 percent if she sold their stories to media outlets.

“Our standard pro bono agreement for legal services provides that if a media entity offers to compensate a client for sharing his or her story we receive a percentage of those fees. This rarely happens. But, on occasion, a case generates media interest and sometimes (not always) a client may receive an appearance fee,” she said.

“As a private law firm we have significant payroll, rent, taxes, insurance and other expenses every week, so an arrangement where we might receive some compensation to defray our costs seems reasonable to us and is agreed to by our clients,” Bloom added.

Bloom told The Hill she had no contact with Clinton or her campaign, but declined to address any contacts with super PACs that supported the Democratic presidential nominee.

Josh Schwerin, the communications director for Priorities USA Action, the largest pro-Clinton super PAC, told The Hill that the group had no relationship with Bloom and had no discussions with her about supporting Trump accusers.

One Bloom client who received financial help from Bloom was New York City makeup artist Jill Harth.

The former beauty contestant manager filed a sexual harassment lawsuit against Trump in 1997 and then withdrew it under pressure. The news media discovered the litigation during the election, and Harth’s name became public in the summer of 2016. She asked Bloom to represent her in the fall after hearing Trump describe her allegations against him as false, and became a vocal critic of Trump.
“I consider myself lucky to have had Lisa Bloom by my side after my old lawsuit resurfaced. She advised me with great competence and compassion,” Harth told The Hill.

Harth said she did not originally ask Bloom for money, even though her cosmetics business suffered from the notoriety of the campaign stories about her.

But later, Bloom arranged a small payment from the licensing of some photos to the news media, and then set up a GoFundMe.com account to raise money for Harth in October 2016. “Jill put herself out there, facing off with Donald Trump. Let’s show her some love,” the online fundraising appeal set up by Bloom’s husband declared.

The effort raised a little over $2,300.

Bloom then arranged for a donor to make a larger contribution to help Harth pay off the mortgage on her Queens apartment in New York City. The amount was under $30,000, according to a source directly familiar with Harth’s situation. Public records show Harth’s mortgage was recorded as extinguished on Dec. 19, 2016.

Harth said the payments did not affect the merits of her allegations. She alleges that during a January 1993 meeting at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate, the future president pushed her up against a wall and groped her, trying to get his hands up her dress.

“Nothing that you’ve said to me about my mortgage or the Go Fund Me that was created to help me out financially affects the facts or the veracity of my 1997 federal complaint against Donald J. Trump for sexual harassment and assault,” she told The Hill.

“Having to retell my experiences of Donald Trump's harassment is the hardest thing I've ever had to do.”

Trump has steadfastly denied assaulting or harassing women, even after a videotape surfaced in September 2016 in which he can be heard boasting that famous men like him can grab women by the genitalia without consequence. Trump has dismissed the tape as "locker room talk."

Harth is currently writing a memoir about her whole experience, but without Bloom’s help.

Bloom acknowledged arranging financial help for Harth, who she said had lost income because of the publicity surrounding her allegations.

“She endured a tidal wave of hate for it. It was very painful for her. And as a New York City makeup artist, Jill lost jobs after she came out publicly against Donald Trump. I believed that people wanted to donate to help her, so we set up the GoFundMe account,” she told The Hill.

The Hill does not identify the names of victims of sexual assault or harassment unless they go public on their own, like Harth.

But one woman who did not go public with allegations agreed to share her documents and talk to The Hill about her interactions with Bloom if The Hill honored its commitment to maintain her anonymity.

Both that woman and Harth, who were friends, stressed that Bloom never asked them to make any statements or allegations except what they believed to be true.

Their texts and emails indicate Bloom held a strong dislike of Trump though. Bloom is the daughter of Gloria Allred, another prominent attorney who is representing a number of women who have made accusations of sexual misconduct against Trump.

In an email to the unnamed woman, Bloom said that her story was “further evidence of what a sick predator this man is,” referring to Trump.

Documents also show Bloom’s efforts to get alleged victims of sexual assault or harassment to come out against Trump intensified as Election Day 2016 approached.

When Harth, for instance, informed Bloom she had just made a Facebook post urging other women to come forward about Trump in October 2016, the lawyer texted back: “Wow Jill that would be amazing. 27 days until the election.”

And when a potential client abruptly backed out of a pre-election news conference in which she was supposed to allege she was sexually assaulted at age 13, Bloom turned her attention to another woman.

That woman, Harth’s friend, went back and forth for weeks with Bloom in 2016 about going public with an allegation of an unsolicited advance by Trump on the 1990s beauty contest circuit.

“Give us a clear sense of what you need and we will see if it we can get it,” Bloom texted the woman a week before Election Day.

“I’m scared Lisa. I can’t relocate. I don’t like taking other people’s money,” the woman wrote to Bloom.

“Ok let’s not do this then,” Bloom responded. “We are just about out of time anyway.”

The woman then texted back demanding to know why there was a deadline. “What does time have to do with this? Time to bury Trump??? You want my story to bury trump for what? Personal gain? See that 's why I have trust issues!!”

The woman told The Hill in an interview that Bloom initially approached her in early October through Harth. She said she considered coming forward with her account of an unsolicited advance by Trump solely to support her friend Harth, and not because she had any consternation with Trump, who ended the advance when she asked him to stop, she said.

The woman said Bloom initially offered a $10,000 donation to the woman’s favorite church, an account backed up by text messages the two exchanged.

“Please keep the donation offer confidential except to your pastor,” Bloom wrote the woman on Oct. 14, 2016.

When Bloom found out the woman was still a supporter of Trump and associated with lawyers, friends and associates of the future president, she texted a request that jarred the woman.

“When you have a chance I suggest you delete the August 2015 Facebook post about supporting Trump,” Bloom texted. “Otherwise the reporter will ask you how you could support him after what he did to you. Your call but it will make your life easier.”

The woman declined. “I hate to say it, but i still rather have trump in office than hillary,” the woman texted back. Bloom answered, “Ok I respect that. Then don’t change anything.”

Eventually the two decided the woman’s continued support of Trump was a benefit to her narrative if she went public with her accusations, the messages show. “I love your point about being a Trump supporter too,” Bloom texted on Oct. 14, 2016.

The text messages show the woman made escalating requests for more money.

By early November, the woman said, Bloom’s offers of money from donors had grown to $50,000 to be paid personally to her, and then even higher.

“Another donor has reached out to me offering relocation/security for any woman coming forward. I’m trying to reach him,” Bloom texted the woman on Nov. 3, 2016. Later she added, “Call me I have good news.”

The woman responded that she wasn’t impressed with the new offer of $100,000 given that she had a young daughter. “Hey after thinking about all this, I need more than $100,000.00. College money would be nice” for her daughter. “Plus relocation fees, as we discussed.”

The figured jumped to $200,000 in a series of phone calls with Bloom that week, according to the woman. The support was promised to be tax-free and also included changing her identity and relocating, according to documents and interviews.

Bloom told The Hill that the woman asked for money as high as $2 million in the conversations, an amount that was a nonstarter, but the lawyer confirmed she tried to arrange donations to the woman in the low six figures.

“She asked to be compensated, citing concerns for her safety and security and over time, increased her request for financial compensation to $2 million, which we told her was a non-starter,” Bloom told The Hill. “We did relay her security concerns to donors, but none were willing to offer more than a number in the low six figures, which they felt was more appropriate to address her security and relocation expenses.”

The woman said that when she initially talked to Bloom she simply wanted to support Harth and had no interest in being portrayed as an accuser or receiving money. But when Bloom’s mention of potential compensation became more frequent, the woman said she tried to draw out the lawyer to see how high the offer might reach and who might be behind the money.

Just a few days before the election, the woman indicated she was ready to go public with her story, then landed in the hospital and fell out of contact with Bloom.

The lawyer repeatedly texted one of the woman’s friends on Nov. 4, 2016, but the friend declined to put the woman on the phone, instead sending a picture of the client in a hospital bed.

Bloom persisted, writing in a series of texts to the friend that she needed to talk to her hospitalized client because it could have “a significant impact on her life” and a “big impact on her daughter” if she did not proceed with her public statement as she had planned.

“She is in no condition for visitors,” the friend texted Bloom back.

“If you care about her you need to leave her be until she is feeling better,” the friend added in another text.

Bloom hopped on a plane from California to come see the woman on the East Coast, according to the text messages and interviews.

The next day, the woman finally reconnected with Bloom and informed her she would not move forward with making her allegations public. Bloom reacted in a string of text messages after getting the news.

“I am confused because you sent me so many nice texts Wednesday night after my other client wasted so much of my time and canceled the press conference,” Bloom texted on Nov. 5, 2016. “That meant a lot to me. Thursday you said you wanted to do this if you could be protected/relocated. I begged you not to jerk me around after what I had just gone through.”

A little later, she added another text. “You have treated me very poorly. I have treated you with great respect as much as humanly possible. I have not made a dime off your case and I have devoted a great deal of time. It doesn’t matter. I could have done so much for you. But you can’t stick to your word even when you swear you will.”

After the woman was released from the hospital, she agreed to meet Bloom at a hotel on Nov. 6, just two days before Trump unexpectedly defeated Clinton.

The woman told The Hill in an interview that at the hotel encounter, Bloom increased the offer of donations to $750,000 but still she declined to take the money.

The woman texted Bloom that day saying she didn’t mean to let her lawyer down.
“You didn’t let me down,” Bloom texted back. “You came and spoke to me and made the decision that’s right for you. That’s all I wanted.”

Bloom confirmed to The Hill that she flew to Virginia to meet with the woman after she had changed her mind several times about whether to go public with her accusations against Trump.
“We invited her to meet with us at the hotel restaurant and she accepted. Ultimately, after another heartfelt discussion, she decided that she did not want to come forward, and we respected her decision,” Bloom told The Hill.

Bloom said the donor money was never intended “to entice women to come forward against their will.”

“Nothing can be further from the truth. Some clients asked for small photo licensing fees while others wanted more to protect their security,” she said.

Bloom declined to identify the name of any donors who would have provided money for women making accusations against Trump.

Harth and the woman who decided not to go public said they never were given any names of donors.
But Bloom told the woman who declined to come forward that she had reached out to political action committees supporting Clinton’s campaign.

“It’s my understanding that there is some Clinton Super Pack [sic] that could help out if we did move forward,” the woman wrote Bloom on Oct. 11, 2016. “If we help the Clinton campaign they in turn could help or compensate us?”

Bloom wrote back, “Let’s please do a call. I have already reached out to Clinton Super PACs and they are not paying. I can get you paid for some interviews however.”

The woman who ultimately declined to come forward with Bloom told The Hill that she stayed silent for an entire year afterward because she did not want to call attention to her family.

She said she supported Trump in 2016, and that he she held no resentment about the early 1990s advance because Trump stopped it as soon as she asked him.

She said she remains friends with many people associated with the president to this day, including one of his best personal friends and a lawyer who works for one of the firms representing Trump.

The woman said, however, no one associated with the Trump White House or the president forced her to come forward or made any offers to induce her to talk to The Hill. She said she agreed to do so only after she became disgusted to learn this past October that Bloom had agreed to work in defense of Weinstein.

“I couldn’t understand how she could say she was for people like me and then represent someone like him. And then all the money stuff I knew about. I just became frustrated,” she said.

Bloom dropped her representation of Weinstein as the accusations piled up against him, telling Buzzfeed that it had been a “colossal mistake.”

Nearly from the beginning, Bloom made clear to the woman she would have to pay her law firm a commission on any fees the attorney arranged from media outlets willing to pay for the woman’s story, according to a copy of a contract as well as a text message sent to the woman.

“Outlets with which I have good relationships that may pay for your first on camera interview, revealing your name and face: Inside Edition, Dr. Phil, LawNewz.com,” Bloom texted the woman just weeks before Election Day. “My best estimate of what I could get for you would be $10-15,000 (less our 1/3 attorney fee)."

“If you are interested I would recommend Inside Edition or Dr. Phil as they are much bigger. Dr. Phil is doing a show on Trump accusers next Tuesday in LA and would fly you here and put you up in a nice hotel, and pay for your meals as well, with your daughter if you like,” Bloom’s text added.

“Media moves very quickly so you need to decide and then once confirmed, you need to stick to it.”
Representatives of "Inside Edition" and "Dr. Phil" said they did not pay any Trump accusers for appearances last year.

Bloom’s firm sent the woman a “media-related services” contract to represent her for “speaking out against Donald Trump” that laid out business terms for selling a story in the most direct terms.

“You will compensate the Firm thirty-three percent (33%) of the total fee that you collect, whether the media deal or licensing fees is for print, Internet, radio, television, film or any other medium,” Bloom’s proposed contract, dated Oct. 10, 2016, read. The woman said she signed the contract.

When Bloom found out in early November that the woman and the friend had discussions with CBS News about doing an interview on their own, the lawyer texted back: “CBS does not pay for stories.”

A little later Bloom sent another text suggesting the arrangements she was making could be impacted by the unauthorized media contacts. “You and your friends should not be shopping the story it will come back to bite you,” Bloom texted. “And this whole thing we have worked so hard to make happen will go away.”

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