Monday, February 18, 2019

Did Detroit Public Schools Exclude John Conyers In Its New Curriculum?


Detroit Public Schools is focusing on teaching Detroit history for Black History Month.

Wonderful.

Having not seen the curriculum, I am going to say that anything dealing with John Conyers, Jr. was wiped.

How can I come to this speculative conclusion?

Well, in the local CVS by the pharmacy counter, you have a series of these primers and they are rewriting civil rights history by excluding Detroit.

There was not one mention of Coretta Scott King's work with John Conyers, Jr. in one of their most historic endeavors as the Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday, and what went on behind the scenes.

 WhoHQ.com is parked to http://www.whowasbookseries.com/ which is part of Penquin Random House which brings me to its foundation.

Yes, it seems  http://foundation.penguinrandomhouse.com/ is a child welfare NGO that does not seem to have any IRS filings, which comes across as a Delaware, foreign corporation, not in good standing, File #2416321 but quite active being what I like to term as a Corporate Shape Shifter.

https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/about-us/social-responsibility/

I just thought I would raise a few issues in likely omissions considering the fact that we are about to enter an unprecedented legal history that would just have to make all these lovely crafters of Detroit history to have to go back to the drawing board and pull all these books off the shelves.

The wiping out of legacies is why I do what I do.




Like I always say, propaganda always starts with the children because no one cares and trafficking tiny humans is a multi-quadrillion dollar industry, or rather the residual of the peculiar institution.

You only know what you are told so someone needs to answer about the ethical component of being selective with Detroit's history.

I do not know if Penguin Random House is part of this Detroit Public Schools contract, but I know how to spot those transposable models because there is a strong possibility there are Social Impact Bonds and this is a foreign educational model that has failed to register under the Foreign Agents Registration Act.  https://global.penguinrandomhouse.com/


Black history amplified in updated Detroit schools curriculum

DETROIT (FOX 2) - A new history curriculum is being rolled out at the Detroit Public Schools Community Districts for grades K through 5 focused on the City of Detroit. 

"It relates to who they are," said Dana Thomas. Golightly Education Center teacher. "It is a part of their identity. Some of the students have seen these buildings before, they have been to these places.

And it is just that much more meaningful.

This new Detroit history curriculum is being rolled out at Detroit Public Schools Community District - first in grades k through 5. But it signals a continuing shift in what is taught in DPSCD.

"This isn't really about being supplemental," Vitti said. "It is about trying to change the way we teach and the materials that we use."

For kindergarteners analyzing a street car on Congress being pulled by horses transports them to the past. For older kids, the people of the city and the untold stories of early Detroit, might be the focus instead.

The curriculum will be different for students in each grade. For example, children in the fifth grade will learn about free and enslaved Africans in early Detroit.  

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Who Are The 19 Clients Of Perkins Coie Sucks Attorney Mark Patterson?

Oh my!

Can you say "attorney client privilege" is to be stripped?

I can.

I can say TARP, too.

I can also say Perkins Coie Sucks.


GOLDMAN LOBBYIST TURNED SCHUMER GENERAL COUNSEL IS HIDING MOST FORMER CLIENTS’ NAMES

A FORMER Goldman Sachs lobbyist who now works as the top lawyer for Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., declined to name 19 of his 20 former clients in his financial disclosure last year.

Mark Patterson, who also served as former Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner’s chief of staff during the Obama administration, joined Schumer’s office last year. He had been a co-chair of the Perkins Coie law firm’s public and strategic affairs practice since 2014.

An archived version of Perkins Coie’s website, directly below, says that Patterson provided “policy analysis and strategic counsel to clients such as major corporations, financial institutions and nonprofit organizations.” He gave few specifics in his 2018 financial disclosure, asserting that he had to withhold the identities of nearly all of his clients based on rules of professional conduct for lawyers.
Mark Patterson
#perkinscoiesucks
Mark A. Patterson was Chief of Staff at the U.S. Department of the Treasury under Secretaries Timothy F. Geithner and Jacob J. Lew.  He is the longest-serving Chief of Staff in Treasury Department history, and is a recipient of the Alexander Hamilton Award, the Department’s highest honor.  As co-leader – with Pete Rouse – of the firm's Public and Strategic Affairs Group, he provides policy analysis and strategic counsel to clients such as major corporations, financial institutions and nonprofit organizations.  Mark advises business leaders and other clients on federal and state policy issues, crisis management and related public communications challenges.
A lawyer with extensive leadership experience in government and the private sector, Mark served for many years as a senior staff member in the U. S. Senate, where he worked as Policy Director for Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle.  Prior to that, he was an aide to Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan for more than a decade.  He held several positions on Senator Moynihan’s staff, including Democratic Staff Director and Chief Counsel at the Senate Committee on Finance, where Moynihan was the Ranking Democrat.  Mark was Senator Moynihan’s longest-serving chief aide on the Finance Committee.
MORE
Professional Leadership

It’s the same rationale that former Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., used last month to avoid naming nine of his 36 previous clients, as The Intercept previously reported.

A Schumer spokesperson did not respond to questions.

At Schumer’s office, Patterson is now at the center of a fight over corporate governance. Since President Donald Trump took office, organizations like Demand Progress and the Revolving Door Project have pressured Schumer to use the limited powers at his disposal to encourage stricter oversight by recommending progressive watchdogs to regulatory agency boards. (Schumer, as minority leader, selects appointees for Democratic seats on regulatory bodies, who then need to be formally nominated by the White House).

The effort has produced mixed results: Although Schumer last year proposed nominees that progressives support, the White House didn’t nominate two of them, and Republicans didn’t hold votes on the other two nominees.

A coalition of 20 organizations recently wrote to Schumer demanding that he work to fill Democratic vacancies at the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and the Merit Systems Protection Board. The letter faulted Schumer for allowing Trump’s judicial nominees to win confirmation by unanimous consent. Schumer could have used those vacancies as leverage to force votes on his party’s regulatory nominees, the progressives argued.

HuffPost this week called the fight over the regulatory bodies a “moment of truth” for Schumer and Senate Democrats. Jeff Hauser, who leads the Revolving Door Project in Washington, D.C., believes that Patterson deserves some blame for the botched vacancies. After Patterson was hired, Schumer’s office told The Nation that the former Goldman lobbyist — unlike his predecessor — wouldn’t be involved in vetting appointments to federal commissions. That’s a problem, said Hauser.

“I think we should in general try to not hire people for senior jobs where they’re going to be recused from certain matters,” Hauser said. “It would make sense that your chief counsel would be involved in the SEC and FDIC hiring process. It’s something you want your chief counsel to be involved in. If he is complying with his recusal, that might explain the relative indifference, because the senior person on leadership staff who should be raising alarms that these nominations are languishing with Trump is disempowered.”

Hauser said Patterson’s financial disclosure “illustrates a lot of the weakness in our ethics rules, because there is insufficient skepticism about self-reported matters.”

“We only have his word that those 19 clients required that level of confidentiality,” Hauser said. “If he’s hiding his clients, it’s hard to even know what we don’t want him involved in, by definition, because he’s preventing us the ability to know what is a conflict of interest.”

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Cocktails & Popcorn: February 18th Summary - Mueller, McCabe, Whelan, Erickson, Calvey, Butina


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Cocktails & Popcorn: Roger Stone Reveals Nixon's Martini Recipe For U.S. Judiciary Impeachment Hearings




U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee Examines Special Counsel Under Watergate


902. 1996 AMENDMENTS TO 18 U.S.C. § 1001

The False Statements Accountability Act of 1996 (FSAA), Pub. L. No. 104-292, H.R. 3166 (October 11, 1996), made several changes that affect the work of United States Attorneys' Offices, including revisions to 18 U.S.C. §§  1001, 1505, 6005, and 28 U.S.C. 1365. This section describes the changes to section 1001.

Section 2 of the FSAA revises section 1001 of title 18, United States Code. The new 18 U.S.C. § 1001, effective October 11, 1996, reads as follows:
  1. Except as otherwise provided in this section, whoever, in any matter within the jurisdiction of the executive, legislative, or judicial branch of the Government of the United States, knowingly and willfully --
    1. falsifies, conceals, or covers up by any trick, scheme, or device a material fact;
    2. makes any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or representation; or
    3. makes or uses any false writing or document knowing the same to contain any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or entry; shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 5 years, or both.
  2. Subsection (a) does not apply to a party to a judicial proceeding, or that party's counsel, for statements, representations, writings or documents submitted by such party or counsel to a judge or magistrate in that proceeding.
  3. With respect to any matter within the jurisdiction of the legislative branch, subsection (a) shall apply only in --
    1. administrative matters, including a claim for payment, a matter related to the procurement of property or services, personnel or employment practices, or support services, or a document required by law, rule, or regulation to be submitted to the Congress or any office or officer within the legislative branch; or
    2. any investigation or review, conducted pursuant to the authority of any committee, subcommittee, commission or office of the Congress, consistent with applicable rules of the House or Senate.
The new section 1001 contains several important features. First, section 2 of the FSAA restores the Department's ability to prosecute false statements made to the judicial and legislative branches. In 1995, the Supreme Court reversed long-settled precedent in Hubbard v. United States, 115 S.Ct. 1754 (1995), and held that a court is neither a "department" nor an "agency" under § 1001. Although the Court's opinion left open the possibility that a judicial or legislative entity might still be considered an "agency" under section 1001, several courts interpreted Hubbard broadly to mean that section 1001 applies only to false statements made to the executive branch. See, e.g.United States v. Dean, 55 F.3d 640 (D.C. Cir. 1995), cert. denied, 116 S.Ct. 1288 (1996); United States v. Rostenkowski, 59 F.3d 1291, 1301 (D.C. Cir. 1995). As of March 1997, there was pending in the District of Columbia Circuit an interlocutory appeal concerning whether the old version of section 1001, even after Hubbard, still applies to financial disclosure statements that Members of Congress filed, pursuant to the Ethics in Government Act, with the Clerk of the House of Representatives before October 11, 1996. See United States v. Oakar, No. 96-3084 (D.C. Cir.). Prosecutors therefore should not concede, in any pleadings or arguments presented in federal courts, that the old section 1001 does not apply to such statements, at least until the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit decides this case.

The new statute effectively overrules Hubbard, and expressly provides that section 1001 covers false statements that are made to all three branches of the federal government, without regard to whether the entity may be categorized as a "department" or "agency."

By including certain statutory terms (e.g., "jurisdiction" and "statement") from the former section 1001 without change, Congress intended that those terms, as reenacted, continue to carry with them the body of existing judicial constructions of those terms. For example, with respect to statements made within the jurisdiction of the executive branch, prosecutors should continue to consider all statements -- whether oral or written, and whether sworn or unsworn -- as being within the scope of the new section 1001. See H.R. Rep. No. 104-680 (July 16, 1996) at 8 ("Other than establishing materiality as an element of all three offenses, the Committee does not view the offenses defined in paragraphs (1), (2) and (3) as changing already existing case law as it relates to the elements of the offenses.")(There was no Senate report concerning the Act, and the House report covers only the changes that the Act made to section 1001).

Section 2 of the FSAA, however, contains certain limitations concerning statements within the jurisdiction of the judicial and legislative branches. Subsection 2(b) of the FSAA provides that statements made to a judge or magistrate by parties or their counsel in a judicial proceeding will not be subject to prosecution under section 1001. Section 2 of the FSAA thus codifies a limited version of the "judicial function exception," which was created by the courts under the old section 1001 to avoid the chilling of advocacy that might occur if attorneys and parties were subject to prosecution for concealing facts from a court or jury. Under the codified version of the judicial function exception, parties or their counsel may be prosecuted for false submissions to other entities within the judicial branch, such as the probation office. See H.R. Rep. No. 104-680 at 9. Non-parties may be prosecuted for any false submission within the jurisdiction of the judicial branch.

In subsection (c) of amended § 1001, Congress created a "legislative function exception." Under the new provision, false statements within the jurisdiction of the legislative branch are subject to prosecution only if they relate to administrative matters or congressional investigations conducted consistent with the applicable congressional rules. Amended §  1001 will thus reach those documents that have most often been the subject of congressional false statement prosecutions, such as vouchers, payroll documents, and Ethics in Government Act (EIGA) financial disclosure forms. The exception was intended to protect, among other things, the free flow of constituent submissions to Congress. See H.R. Rep. No. 104-680 at 4-5.

Amended § 1001 also expressly includes materiality as an element under each of the three clauses in subsection (a). This resolves a conflict among the courts on that issue. See, e.g.United States v. Corsino, 812 F.2d 26 (1st Cir. 1987); United States v. Elkin, 731 F.2d 1005 (2d Cir. 1984).


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Chuck Grassley & His FARA Legacy In Voting Rights

If the Green initiative NGOs have to register as foreign agents, well, that means the Religious initiative NGOs have to register, too.

And so do the Media, main stream and social have to register because they all fund political campaigns.

I feel his passion.


U.S. environmental activists who are working to halt the production and use of fossil fuels could be required to register as foreign agents if Congress gets serious about enforcing an existing law.

There was some potential movement in that direction last October when Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, introduced legislation that would put some teeth into the Foreign Agents Registration Act. The law, which was first passed in 1938, calls for individuals and organizations to provide full disclosure when they are working to advance the public policy interests of a foreign government.

As the Washington Examiner has reported, Grassley’s proposed legislation would close off an exemption that has allowed lobbyists for foreign interests to avoid registration while providing the U.S. attorney general with additional authority to conduct investigations.

While the media remains largely focused on ongoing investigations into allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 campaign, the connection between Vladimir Putin’s government and U.S. environmental groups deserves more scrutiny.

Klein Ltd., a Bermuda-based shell corporation run by executives with strong ties to longtime Putin friend Leonid Reiman and Russian energy investment groups including Firebird New Russia Fund and Vimpelcom Ltd., reportedly funneled $23 million to the Sea Change Foundation, according to a detailed 2014 U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee report.
(Editor’s Note: The Sea Change Foundation is controlled by Kona residents Nathaniel Simons and his wife Laura Baxter-Simons.)

Klein’s legal counsel dismisses such charges as “completely false and irresponsible.” But in a letter addressed to U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, members of Congress document evidence pointing to a paperless money trail that flows from Russia into U.S. environmental groups through the Sea Change Foundation. The implication is that the Russians have been pouring tens of millions of dollars into willing environmental advocacy groups in an effort to spread propaganda directed against fracking in the U.S. and the technology that makes it possible, according to evidence presented in the letter.

Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, chairman of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, and his colleagues have called on the U.S. Treasury Department to conduct an investigation into the allegations of Russian collusion with U.S. environmental groups. In response to a media inquiry I sent last year asking about the allegations, a U.S. Treasury spokesman said in an email message, “We respond as appropriate to Congressional inquiries, but wouldn’t comment publicly on an investigation.”

The motivation for Russian interference here is clear. As the congressional letter notes, American ingenuity in the oil and gas industry have significant geopolitical ramifications. Thanks to innovative extraction technologies such as hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, the U.S. now has access to vast reserves of oil and gas previously held to be unrecoverable. The unexpected energy resource bonanza has dramatically shifted the dynamics of the economic and geopolitical landscape in America’s favor.

The U.S. is the top producer of natural gas in the world. In 2016, U.S. natural gas imports set a record low even though consumption has increased. In 3 of the first 5 months of 2017, U.S. natural gas exports were greater than imports — the growing trend points to the U.S. becoming a net exporter. This new commitment to natural gas means less expensive energy bills for consumers as well as economic, environmental, and national security benefits for the country as a whole. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce estimates that the fracking boom has created 2.7 million jobs, with an estimated additional 3.5 million projected by 2035.

From a foreign policy perspective, the U.S. can now export liquefied natural gas to parts of Europe that have been dependent on Putin’s government for their gas. This weakens Putin and puts the U.S. in a stronger position to exert influence. Up until now, periodic disputes with Russia have resulted in economic bullying tactics from Moscow that include wintertime threats to close pipelines supplying oil and natural gas. Those days may be over now that American natural gas development is poised to impact Russia and its Gazprom oil company.

However, an international campaign known as “Keep It in the Ground” has been pushing an anti-fossil fuel agenda that advances Russia’s geopolitical interests at the expense of the U.S. and America’s allies. The campaign claims support from more than 400 organizations
 across the globe, with a sizable percentage operating inside the U.S. The campaign is opposed not just to the extraction of fossil fuels, but to any fossil fuel-related project including pipelines, rail transportation, refineries, and energy exploration.

These groups include Greenpeace, the Sierra Club, 350.org, the Center for Biological Diversity, WildEarth Guardians, the Rainforest Action Network, Earthworks, and the Chesapeake Climate Action Network, to name just a few.

Some of the larger environmental advocacy groups in the U.S., such as the Natural Resources Defense Council and the League of Conservation Voters, don’t appear on the list of 400, yet do support the same anti-fossil policy aims and draw from the same pool of financial supporters.

The common denominator here between many of these groups is the San Francisco-based Sea Change Foundation, which has been identified as the incubator for Russian funding of environmental groups. Another key player is the Energy Foundation, which is also based in San Francisco and appears to be an offshoot of the Sea Change Foundation.

If Grassley succeeds in bolstering the Foreign Agents Registration Act, a good starting point for an investigation would be with the “Keep It in the Ground” campaign members and with other environmental groups that support the campaign’s agenda.

While these groups are free to advocate for their preferred policies, they should not be permitted to posture as grassroots activists if they are in fact doing the bidding of foreign interests, to the detriment of average Americans who benefit from affordable and reliable sources of energy.

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Saskia Thompson Is LeadingThe Detroit Land Bank Authority Through A Federal Investigation

In the spirit of fuchsia....

Detroit Land Bank Authority Executive Director Saskia Thompson on leading through controversy

Saskia Thompson -on a personal note, showcasing the historic
beauty of what was ripped from the people in fraudulent tax
and mortgage schemes may not be the best image to roll with.
Saskia Thompson leads an organization everyone has an opinion about.

I do not have opinions. I have evidence.

She's the executive director of the Detroit Land Bank Authority, which owns about 27,000 Detroit structures — mostly residential properties. The public agency sells properties at auction and on the traditional real estate market and has demolished more than 10,000 structures since Mayor Mike Duggan took office in 2014.

How is the Detroit Land Bank Authority a public agency when you write the checks out to the Corporate Shape Shifter Title Source? Normally, in government, or an incorporated entity, you write the check out to the City of Detroit, and not use a FEIN of a 501c3 Detroit Land Bank Community Development Corporation.

Thompson came to the DLBA in 2017, amid a federal investigation into the agency that had begun a year earlier into its demolition program, which is funded in part by federal dollars. The agency has faced scrutiny for its evaluation of demolition bids, its billing of federal dollars and how its contractors have handled hazardous materials abatement and fill dirt. The investigation is ongoing.

The lead "public agency" is called SIGTARP, of the U.S. Treasury. I still want to know how you contracted for demolition when you are not the City of Detroit.  How were the checks cashed?

Thompson has brought nearly 20 years of experience in municipal government to bear in righting the ship. She worked for Mayor Dennis Archer's administration as an assistant for public policy projects from 2000-2001. After that, Thompson worked for the city of Charlotte, N.C. for about nine years before moving to Philadelphia, Pa. for a position as the city's deputy finance director and executive director of the office of property data. She left Philadelphia to join the DLBA, where she leads the agency's staff of 150.

She should have stayed in North Carolina.

This interview has been edited and condensed.
How did your upbringing influence your career?

My mother is a lawyer and spent her career working in downtown Detroit fighting for pension, Social Security and workers' compensation issues. She later focused on employment discrimination. My father is a professor and does a lot of economic work. He was a union organizer for a long time. It wouldn't fly if I told them that I was going to work for corporate America helping other people make money. The overarching mantra in my family growing up was, whatever you do, you have to give back in some way.

Detroit shaped me as much as my family did. I went to Detroit Public Schools (Thompson graduated from Cass Technical High School) and took Detroit transportation. When people say there's two Detroits and people are left out of this new generation, I don't debunk that. Downtown today doesn't look like how it did when I previously worked here. However, we can still make this a city that everyone can participate in.

We as Detroiters get to pick what we are going to be going forward and I think because I'm from here, I understand that.

Why did you move back to Detroit? How have you seen the city change?

When I worked for Dennis Archer there were a lot of exciting things going on in Detroit in the late '90s and early 2000s. We were building Campus Martius, General Motors was moving into the Renaissance Center and the Super Bowl was going to be held in Detroit. I worked on a lot of exciting projects — including making the Renaissance Center streetscape accessible for pedestrians and many big projects that had the potential to be game-changers. You had hope and felt like a lot of positive things were going on.

When I moved away from Detroit in 2002, Detroit was struggling with a shrinking economy. My frame of reference at the time was so specific to Detroit that it was hard to see how other cities were struggling with problems. I remember doing police ride-alongs when I was working in Charlotte and wondering where all the bad neighborhoods were.

I don't feel like I actively decided to move back to Detroit. I wasn't really ready to leave Philadelphia, because my daughter was about to be a senior in high school and I was not looking to uproot her.

However, the more I looked at this job, I decided it was the right move for me. I came to the conclusion that being at the land bank at this point in time was a unique opportunity and that I was uniquely qualified to be the person who took over. I am a Detroiter and I understand the factors of how we got here and what that actually means to people.

What do you feel are some common misconceptions about the Detroit Land Bank?

People automatically assume that if there's a blighted property in Detroit we own it. That was the image promoted. We own a quarter of the real estate in Detroit, but we don't own everything, so we're not in control of all of the factors in the neighborhoods that would make things better for folks. The city has a tremendous number of challenges, but none of them are new. We own properties that have been in public ownership for decades, or in some cases did not sell for $500 at county auctions. We own property that somebody thought had no value at all, and our job is to create value out of that and to remind people that there is value in this city. We still want to know who owns the land because I found a land patent.

The misconception that frustrates me the most is that we're mismanaging demolition. With all the negative press the land bank received about demolition, there was no focus on all the other positive work the land bank was and still is doing. Even when I was doing my due diligence about coming here, people would say, "You don't want to take over the land bank. Everybody there is terrible and you've got to clean house." When I got here I learned that's clearly not true. This organization is full of smart, talented, dedicated people who are committed to making positive changes.  The DLBA is full of "Legal Geniuses" (trademark pending) and I wonder if this is the reason for this job posting for general counsel. They are going to need really good inhouse counsel considering the fact that they are not part of the City of Detroit, with no access to its Corporate Counsel, unless Larry Garcia is monitoring the contracts with them as a "public agency".
General CounselDetroit Land Bank AuthorityDetroit, MI Full Time
GENERAL JOB SUMMARY
General Counsel is the Detroit Land Bank Authority’s (DLBA) Chief Attorney.  As such, he/she is responsible for overseeing and identifying the legal issues in all departments and their interrelation, as well as business policy.  They will also oversee the entire legal team.
ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:
Provide legal opinions and counsel, and serve as a trusted advisor to the Board, Executive Director and Executive level staff
Keep abreast of DLBA’s legal context and advises and educates the Board, and executive team with regard to changes and trends that could affect their ability to advance their programs. These might be related to FOIA requests, real estate laws, land banking laws, etc.
Oversee the DLBA’s legal team
Provide advice to the Executive Director as to the selection and retention of external counsel; and manage the organization’s relationship with external counsel
Coordinate legal and policy reform efforts, including legislative drafting, analysis, testimony, and advocacy
Develop and maintain the legal and contractual infrastructure required of a Michigan public authority including organizational policy, document retention, filing and registration requirements, labor and immigration law, contracts, leases, and agreements
Develop, implement and maintain systems and processes for the documentation and tracking of legal matters, including, for example, filings and registrations, legal threats, business agreements, and the like
Act as a spokesperson and advocate for DLBA’s legal positions as requested by the Executive Director or the Public Affairs team
Meet regularly with all DLBA staff and program leaders to ensure information shared with partners and residents is accurate and timely
Strategize, renegotiate and conclude contracts with vendors, etc. as they arise; and provide effective support of other managers of the organization in their negotiations
Serve as one of the organization’s key contacts and negotiators with government agencies
Ensure a timely response to all legal claims and legal inquires directed to DLBA
Review and approve all legal documents
Assist in developing the values and unique strengths of the DLBA, which is highly transparent, collaborative and community-centric
Communicate regularly with Executive Director regarding status of special projects
Perform additional duties as assigned in Board resolutions and as directed by the Executive Director
QUALIFICATIONS (Knowledge, Experience, Skills and Abilities)
Juris Doctorate from an American Bar Association-accredited law school
Member in good standing of the State Bar of Michigan
At least six (6) years of related legal experience
Knowledge of land banking, tax foreclosure, municipal, and real estate law
Experience with legal issues for non-profit organizations and employment law is appreciated
Excellent time management skills and ability to multi-task
Ability to work well in a fast paced and demanding environment
Detroit residency, preferred
Management experience, particularly supervising/managing legal work of others
Ability to become a trusted advisor who will be viewed as a strong resource with discretion in keeping sensitive material confidential; a hard worker with a high energy level; a strong manager and administrator with a high sense of personal responsibility and integrity
Ability to think analytically and write clearly
Must have a general orientation towards building appropriate processes and structures
Must be a mission-driven individual with a strong sense of public service to the residents of the City of Detroit
Most people think that demolition is most of our business, but it's not. Community members — those day-to-day people who are living in Detroit's neighborhoods — have every right to be frustrated, but they're not worried about our demolition programs. They're worried about the vacant houses on their block. If anything, they want us to be doing demolitions faster. There's been calls from people telling us that we shouldn't be doing any demolition at all, but I guarantee that the people living in the neighborhoods where we made a real impact by tearing down some of these vacant homes feel differently about that. When we demolish a house we are eliminating a noticeable blight on the neighborhood, as vacant houses attract all sorts of crime.

I wonder what happened with the DLBA solicitors over there at WilmerHale?  Oh, wait, Jeannie Rhee and Bob Mueller are busy, busy, busy with Grampa Corsi and the Ham Sandwiches.  On the other hand, it is much more economical to hire inhouse counsel.  I wonder what Michael Brady is up to. 

How did you work to change that narrative?

When I first got here, I felt strongly that we needed to be in the community more than we were. I changed the name of the public affairs department to the community affairs department. That may seem like a small thing, but I wanted us to be in the neighborhoods talking to people and making our programs accessible to them, not requiring people to come downtown to talk to us. Our community affairs staff now holds office hours in every district in the city. I felt that we couldn't change the negative perception to the media until we are actually talking to the people who are living, breathing and benefiting from our programs every day, and the positive stories will follow. Now, almost 18 months later, I still think that was right decision. We still get a ton of phone calls every month, but not every call is negative. People are asking, "How can I buy this home? How can I tap into this program?"

What's the biggest challenge you've had to overcome in your role?

It is hard to manage an organization that everybody has an opinion about via right or wrong. I'm constantly fighting the notion that the land bank does X, Y and Z, and then I have to cut through that myth and say, "I'm sorry that you had this negative experience, but let me help you in the here and now. Let's do this differently." When you are in the media and the news reports so much about one thing and it detracts from everything else — I think the biggest obstacle is overcoming that.
What do you wish people were focusing on?

I am most proud of the fact that every time we manage to sell a house, the buyer is required to fix the condition of their home. It's a condition of the sale. You can't buy a house from the land bank and sit on it with no investment. We are always working toward moving through our inventory as quickly as we can. The goal is to get those houses out of the land bank's inventory and into the hands of the individuals who are going to renovate them and live in them.

Have you fixed the issues with the titles, yet? Make sure to let MIED know when you do.

The best thing the land bank does is require renovation, which creates a whole host of spin-off activities and investment in the city. Every time we successfully sell a house and somebody renovates it, that's another individual or family of people who are living here, shopping here, working here and bringing back that sense of community that we've lost in a lot of places because so many homes were abandoned for so long. We've had noticeable change in four years and I think that folks that work at land bank should be proud of that.

That noticeable change is called gerrymandering.

Voting is beautiful, be beautiful ~ vote.©

Sunday, February 17, 2019

Happy Black History Month: A Tribute To Juicy "Jussie" Smollett For The 2019 Lynching LARP

Jussie Smollett, the black, gay, Jewish actor of the hit show Empire, has made it into the annals of history, and it is not just for Black History Month.

Jussie has taken the lead as the greatest LARP of 2019.

Elizabeth Warren held that title in 2018.

MAGA Attacker Nigerian Brothers Abimbola & Olabinjo Osundairo (right)
It seems Twitter has taken down his name in the trending section.

It also seems Corey Booker and Kamala Harris may have some association with the situation as the attack was timed with their lynching bill, but, hey, what do I know?

HERE ARE ALL THE POLITICIANS WHO RUSHED TO JUDGEMENT ON THE SMOLLETT ‘HATE CRIME’

I know this is another effort to bastardize civil rights history by wiping out Conyers' legacy.

I know what Juicy Jussie did was a hate crime against humanity.

I know not one Jewish, anti-semetic group has lifted a finger for "Juicy Jussie".


Where are all the Jewish anti-semetic groups coming to his defense?

Smollett's attorneys refute charges attack on client was staged




A grand jury will hear the Jussie Smollett case early next week ... law enforcement sources tell TMZ.
Law enforcement sources connected to the investigation tell TMZ, the 2 brothers who were arrested and then released are staying somewhere around the Loop in downtown Chicago under the watchful eye of police so no one gets to them. We're told cops especially want to make sure Jussie does not contact the brothers.
We're told when police raided the home of the 2 brothers they found magazines with pages torn out, and authorities are now trying to determine if the missing pages are connected to the threatening letter that was sent to Jussie 8 days before the alleged attack.
Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, people standing
Maine Waters & Juicy Smollett
Our sources say early on they asked Jussie if he'd sign complaints against the 2 men who attacked him and he was clear that he would. But, when he found out the 2 brothers were the ones in custody we're told he said he knew them, felt bad for them and declined to sign the complaints. 
Our sources say although cops believe the brothers purchased the rope that was around Jussie's neck after the incident, there is no surveillance video at the hardware store because it erases after a week.
We're told the way they tracked the 2 brothers down was by their movements in arriving and leaving the scene around Jussie's apartment building. As we reported, they left in either a cab or an Uber, but we're told cops tracked the vehicle and the 2 brothers got out on their way home and into another vehicle. As one source put it, "It was almost like a bad spy movie."
The sources say there were red flags from the get-go. Cops were extremely suspiciouswhen Jussie took them out to the area where he said he was attacked and pointed to an obscure camera saying how happy he was that the attack was on video. Turns out the camera was pointing in the wrong direction. Cops thought it was weird he knew the location of that camera.
And, there's this. We're told investigators didn't believe the 2 alleged attackers screamed, "This is MAGA country," because, "Not a single Trump supporter watches 'Empire.'"
And, a few loose ends ... we're told when cops picked up the 2 brothers at O'Hare Airport, police were armed with 3 warrants for each man, one of which was to seize their phones.    
We're also told there is no video of a "rehearsal" of the attack in the street.
Jussie and his lawyer have vehemently denied the attack was staged, maintaining this was a hate crime.


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CORBETT: Government by Emergency - #NewWorldNextWeek

A bit of history of National Emergencies to better understand the Michigan Emergency Manager Law, the Detroit Bankruptcy, Grand Bargain, and all the stealin' of the children, the land and the votes.


Here's a list of the 31 national emergencies that have been in effect for years

President Jimmy Carter

Nov 14, 1979: The National Emergency With Respect to Iran, in response to the Iran hostage crisis.

Nov 14, 1994: The National Emergency With Respect to the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction, that combined two previous national emergencies focused on weapons of mass destruction.

Jan. 2, 1995: The National Emergency With Respect to Prohibiting Transactions with Terrorists Who Threaten to Disrupt the Middle East Peace Process placed economic sanctions in response to the Jerusalem bombing.

March 15, 1995: The National Emergency With Respect to Prohibiting Certain Transactions with Respect to the Development of Iranian Petroleum Resources was an effort to prevent potential deals between oil companies.

October 21, 1995: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Assets and Prohibiting Transactions with Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia was declared after increased reports of drug cartels laundering money through American companies.

March 1, 1996: The National Emergency With Respect to Regulations of the Anchorage and Movement of Vessels with Respect to Cuba was after civilian planes were shot down near Cuba.

November 3, 1997: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Sudanese Government Property and Prohibiting Transactions with Sudan implemented economic and trade sanctions.

President George W. Bush.

June 26, 2001: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property of Persons Who Threaten International Stabilization Efforts in the Western Balkans imposed sanctions on those aiding Albanian insurgents in Macedonia

Aug 17, 2001: The National Emergency With Respect to Export Control Regulations renewed presidential power to control exports in a national emergency since the Export Administration Act of 1979 lapsed.

Sept 14, 2001: The National Emergency with Respect to Certain Terrorist Attacks was in response to the terrorist attacks of 9/11 and the continuing and immediate threat of further attacks on the United States.

Sept 23, 2001: The National Emergency With Respect to Persons who Commit, Threaten to Commit, or Support Terrorism was in response to the terrorist attacks of 9/11.

March 6, 2003: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property of Persons Undermining Democratic Processes or Institutions in Zimbabwe was an effort to punish associates of Robert Mugabe.

May 22, 2003: The National Emergency With Respect to Protecting the Development Fund for Iraq and Certain Other Property in Which Iraq has an Interest was issued following the U.S. invasion of Iraq.

May 11, 2004: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property of Certain Persons and Prohibiting the Export of Certain Goods to Syria was in response to Syria supporting terrorist activity in Iraq.

June 16, 2006: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property of Certain Persons Undermining Democratic Processes or Institutions in Belarus was in response to charges of fraud in the Belarus presidential election.

Oct 27, 2006: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo was in response to violence around the Congolese presidential election runoff.

Aug 1, 2007: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property of Persons Undermining the Sovereignty of Lebanon was in response to a breakdown of the rule of law in Lebanon.

June 26, 2008: The National Emergency With Respect to Continuing Certain Restrictions with Respect to North Korea cited the risk of proliferation of weapons-usable fissile material. President Trump renewed this June 22, 2018 citing the “existence and risk of proliferation of weapons-usable fissile material on the Korean Peninsula and the actions and policies of the Government of North Korea continue to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat.”


April 12, 2010: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Conflict in Somalia was in respect to threats posed by Somali pirates.

February 25, 2011: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property and Prohibiting Certain Transactions Related to Libya froze the assets of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi.

July 25, 2011: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property of Transnational Criminals was in response to the rise in crime by specific organizations: Los Zetas (Mexico), The Brothers’ Circle (former Soviet Union countries), the Yakuza (Japan), and the Camorra (Italy).

May 16, 2012: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property of Persons Threatening the Peace, Security, or Stability of Yemen addressed political unrest within the Yemen government.

March 16, 2014: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Situation in Ukraine was in response to the Russian invasion of Crimea.

April 3, 2014: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property of Certain Persons With Respect to South Sudan was in response to the ongoing civil war.

May 12, 2014: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Conflict in the Central African Republic was in response to violence towards humanitarian aid workers.

March 8, 2015: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property and Suspending Entry of Certain Persons Contributing to the Situation in Venezuela was in response to human rights violations.

April 1, 2015: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking the Property of Certain Persons Engaging in Significant Malicious Cyber-Enabled Activities was in response to Chinese cyber attacks on the U.S.

Nov 23, 2015: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Situation in Burundi was declared after a failed coup.

President Donald Trump

Dec 20, 2017: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking the Property of Persons Involved in Serious Human Rights Abuse or Corruption imposed sanctions on the Myanmar general for his role persecuting Rohingya Muslims.

Sept 12, 2018: The National Emergency With Respect to Imposing Certain Sanctions in the Event of Foreign Interference in a United States Election attempted to prevent any meddling with the 2018 midterm elections amid the ongoing investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Nov 27, 2018: The National Emergency With Respect to Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Situation in Nicaragua was declared by President Trump in response to violence and the Ortega regime’s “systematic dismantling and undermining of democratic institutions and the rule of law” that constitutes an “unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States.”

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Cocktails & Popcorn: Watch Then Squirm In Detroit In The LARP

ML Elrich should sit down, with his computer, his phone, a nice IPA and a big bowl of popcorn, with a napkin, of course, and look into to the property and development financial records of that destination of Mayor Mikey.

How come ya never asked about how that video came to be?

Hmmmmmm.......popcorn.......



State police drop extortion investigation of businessman

Bob Carmack is headed to court next week on fraud charges stemming from a city land deal in Detroit.

But, at least for now, he doesn't have to worry about extortion charges lobbed at him by Mayor Mike Duggan.

That same day Michigan State Police opened an investigation into possible extortion by Carmack.

The mayor became concerned about Bob Carmack more than a week after Carmack rented a mobile billboard and played a video that he claims shows Duggan driving his city car to visit a woman Carmack believes is a mistress.

Carmack made the controversial move after he became frustrated that judges would not allow him to question the mayor under oath in any of the lawsuits between Carmack and the city.

The political stunt came on Nov. 14 downtown, where the mobile
 billboard circled City Hall.

Elrick: "What does possibly cheating on his spouse have to do with being a corrupt politician?"
"Well if he is cheating on his wife maybe he is cheating on the people of Detroit," Carmack said at the time. "Maybe he is doing things that aren't proper with the city, with the financers, with tax credits and so forth."

A state police report I obtained using the Michigan Freedom of Information Act shows that troopers interviewed the mayor, his chief of staff Alexis Wiley, and Lawrence Garcia, the head of the city's law department.
Garcia told

 investigators that before Carmack showed the video, Carmack told Garcia: "You better make me happy or I'm going to drop a bomb."

Garcia believes the video was that bomb, and that his purpose was to "Shake up the mayor."

Instead, the mayor held the news conference calling for a state police investigation and promised Detroiters that while embarrassing information may come out that would hurt his family, he would always put Detroiters first.

It does not appear that the state police interviewed anyone else. The report concluded that the investigation is closed and will be reopened if additional information is learned.
Carmack said he did not extort anyone. I contacted the mayor's office but they declined comment.

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